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in terms of foreign policy from the bush doctrine, from the bush era policies, but in many ways has followed them and has been handed this entire security apparatus, this particular program began in 2004, about 400 strikes have happened so far. about 3,000 people have been killed, mostly pakistan, somali, yemen. but you have had this sort of deafening silence for the most part from progressives and liberals around this. you have had a few voices certainly on the hill and even on your network to raise questions about it, but by and large, the president has been given something of a pass. i think also the public has moved beyond this in some ways. there's a post-9/11 new normal in terms of how the public looks at the prosecution of this war on terror. they see it, it seems to me, as a vast war, an endless war in some ways that might be best prosecuted in this way rather than those large land wars we saw in afghanistan and iraq of this sort of pinpointed targeting of folks seem so far to have found some positive backing from americans. >> the cover of "time" magazine is rise of the dro
adviser who can murder you on foreign policy. mexico mississippi? >> john: it's authorizations right here in the continental united states. an increasing number of congress is considering limiting the president's ability to kill on foreign soils. is there anything where we question this? >> you just did a great segment on handguns. the american public, we have a culture of fear. we're terrified of everything. that's why we own so many handguns. that's why we're so willing to allow this president to trample on our freedom because we are so afraid of everything. the language we're going to hear tomorrow is this is a dangerous world. it's the same language we hear all of the obama apologizists talking about, it's the same thing with george bush. this is a dangerous world has been focused to death. they know it scares the american public. we're going to hear it again. this is a culture that will not react until they understand that it affects them. by 2020, john, we're going to have 30,000 drones flying overhead on our domestic soil. it's because of this new idea if it's a drone it's probably
qualities and they will inspire a guide as as we carry out the united states foreign policy in these challenging times ahead. as the son of a diplomat and a member of the united states senate, deeply engaged in american diplomacy, you bring to this office a unique perspective and knowledge of both politics and diplomacy. and of the importance of a professional career in foreign service as the backbone of american diplomacy in the department of state. despite our necessary focus on complex and counter-terrorism, our values, a vision, and interest calls for an overarching diplomatic engagement, recognized worldwide as a leadership role worthy of the united states on behalf of the greater good of mankind. it is truly a great pleasure for us to welcome you here and we trust that under your storage chip, all parts of the state department team will gain in stature and recognition and enhance our professional capabilities to be fully prepared to meet the challenges in these difficult times demand. as we commit our support and loyalty to you, mr. secretary, i also take this opportun
, a discussion about the situation in northern mali. then a look at foreign-policy challenges facing the obama administration. >> on ne
think we have a lot more thoughtful and responsible for and policy. -- foreign policy. we have a lot less swagger. one of the things about gerald ford -- 10 battle stars, silver star, four bronze stars. he had seen it. jim webb was a perfect example -- the senator from virginia. he said, all these think tank commandos in this town, let's go in and get tough -- you do not send force. you send young men and women who have lives and families and hopes and dreams, and you had better think twice, three times, if we will send them in. so i do feel -- the obligatory line for every politician, democrat, republican, is how much we admire the people in the military, the great job they do. i just ask, when was the last time a president of the united states went to a funeral for anybody who came back in a pine box? i cannot find one. one of the reasons is, they do not know anybody in the military. the sons of the cabinet officers or the ceo's or network correspondence or columnist -- when we were debating going to war in iraq, my sister and i called all 535 offices on capitol hill. we asked just
? >> what will he not talk about? >> well, they think that there will not be much talk about foreign policy. you threw me a curve there, maureen. that was good. i think the fact is that they feel that they have a good policy, he's not going to talk about the stories that you just ran about chuck hagel and about brennan at cia, and he is not going to talk about benghazi. he is going to say that the fate of the owe that the state of the union is strong, and he is going to point to his accomplishments. he feels very confident. based on the election results, he is going to do everything he can to make himself and the democratic party look good. >> perhaps, speaking to the state of the republican party, florida senator marco rubio, whose national profile is certainly being elevated, he is giving the republican response, not just in english but in spanish. what ask that say to you? >> that's the wave of the future. obviously they read the election figures. 71% of the voters who were hispanic voted democratic. they realize they're in electoral doomsday if they can't get into that con stitt you the
an important foreign policy shift both in terms of process and engagement in the region. when i say process i say that it is grounded for the first time in our history in the bedrock of parliamentry consent, public legitimacy, and many stakeholders that matter being onboard in the manging of foreign policy. so this is a first for pakistan, including our relationship with the united states, which is now pretty much run by parliamentry guidelines, and we move affording to those now, which does empower us to take decisions that are sustainable, we hope. and we look for a relationship that is long lasting and not just a function of our relationship with the united states and pakistan as it transitions after the region. >> thank you for that. did they offer you breakfast? >> yes, they did. >> so busy taking notes. let me ask you one or two and move to my colleagues. you were early in offering congratulations to john kerry. i wanted to ask you about the impact if any you see kerry moving in as secretary of state is going to have. as you know the "wall street journal" ran an oped piece last week tal
, republican -- one comes in and another goes out. nothing seems to change. it is the exact same foreign policy. it is almost like there is an unseen hand behind both parties. host: do you think you have been given full information about what is happening with the use of drones? do you want to know more about what the u.s. is doing or do you feel like you know enough? caller: what i have seen it, -- abc, cbs, all that a -- i mean, we will never know what they are doing with them. but my main concern, since i've lived in america and i am an american, is there are plans to have drones patrolling our skies. homeland security has ordered drones. they say they are just for surveillance, but it is not a good idea to have remote- control -- heavy ever read "1984" by george orwell? it started like that. you can't have so much power congregated in so few hands. it is in its power to have not only surveillance from the air but also bombing capability, remote-controlled bombing capability. and the decisions made by just a very few people. over a whole population -- it is even passed what george orwell cou
and foreign service and domestic policy. i am also an army veteran and them currently a member of the maryland national guard. >> good for you. >> in the political crisis and the economic crisis in this country, in your speech, you've talked about "week, the people," -- "we, the people." i would like to bring up the social crisis currently. on average, members of the military commit suicide at the rate of 22 deaths per day. that is a the one death every 65 minutes. i would like to know what the department of defense and lawmakers can do to effectively address that crisis, the social problem. and also please say something about homelessness among veterans. >> yes. it is one of the most tragic issues that we deal with right now in the military. it is the growing rate of suicides that are taking place. and in some ways, they reflect the growth of suicide in the general society. part of this, there's no question in my mind that it is related to the stress of war over the last 10 years, the fact that we have deployed people time and time again, time away from their family, time away from the abilit
minutes after the hour nobody knows the foreign policy issues better, more in depth than joe ciriycone from the plow shares fund. you can find out all of the rest of the stuff plow shares is working on at their website, english spelling. we were talking about the chuck hagel and what he might do with the defense budget. i mean there are cuts coming for sure. can defense department survive that? >> it continual you heard leon pan ittetetta say it would be traumatic for the defense department. sequestration is almost certainly going to happen. but there is an upside that it forces choices. there are some turkeys there that are now probably going to get killed. one of them in particular is the plutoneian fuel plant, lindsey graham's home state that was supposed to cost $400 million, now up to 4 billion and real costs probably 6 billion. they wanted to take deadly plutone yam and mix it with fuel. nobody wants to buy it. none of the american peoples want to buy this fuel. it's toxic, hard to handle. it is spiraling out of control. >> bill
casualties, which causes rep percussions to u.s. foreign policy around the world. host: our next call comes from minnesota on our line for democrats. caller: i would like to speak to comments about how people feel about the world who have had these drones tracks, the service men who see this happening around them. what i feel about the throne strikes for killing -- drones tried for killing americans overseas -- drone strikes for killing americans, i have empathy with these drones strikes occur and i hope nobody is killed or hurt. it is not just foreigners who were killing the best we are killing with drones. we are killing americans -- who we are killing which drones. we are killing americans to if they are traitors. i hope they understand-- too if they are traitors. host: does it matter if it is a u.s. citizen or a foreign national it started in the stunted killings -- in these targeted killings? guest: americans have been less concerned with it has not been americans. that raises questions that did not exist under the american constitution. foreigners outside the united states do not have
to the west bank and jordan in the spring, stepping into some of the thorniest foreign-policy challenges facing his second term. also, and other news, about sequestration, the across-the- board spending cuts for the defense department and non- defense programs. here's the economy and business section of the washington post -- march 1 is that deadline. and the navy trims a goal for the size of its fleet, which has sparked concern on capitol hill. those are some other headlines for you this morning. also, we told you yesterday about the justice department deciding to sue the s&p ratings company over the financial crisis and how they rated the mortgage bonds. "usa today" money section says -- we will go to randy in missouri, democratic caller. back to our topic, randy, about drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. go ahead. caller: good morning, greta. this policy out there is not something that has been a secret. it has always been out there. even people in the senate knew about this policy. second, this is about people who are taking up arms who are u.s. citizens, deciding to plot with t
and said the principles of american foreign policy are firmly -- the foundation is firmly rooted in righteousness and justice. we get to do great things here. this is a remarkable place. i am here today to rescue, on -- to ask you, on behalf of the country, i need your help. president obama need your help. to help us, to do everything we can to strengthen our nation and to carry those ideals out into the world. here, we can do the best of things you can do in government. that's what excites me. we get to try to make our nation safer. get to try to make peace in the world, a world where there is far too much conflict, far too much killing. there are alternatives. we get to try to cure disease and empower people who have no voice. we get to talk about empowering people through our ideals and through those ideals hopefully they can change their lives. that's what's happening in the world today. we get to live the ideals of our nation which and in doing , so i think we can make our country stronger and we can make the world more peaceful. so i look forward to joining with you as we m
to eat at luncheon table even though they had main speakers at the press club. they had a policy of having foreign dignitaries speak here at the press club. and so women assigned to cover the people were cooped up here in the hot, miserable balcony where they couldn't eat and here they could see men colleagues down on the floor having a nice lunch. also they couldn't hear up there. they didn't have enough room to take notes with it was miserable. that was indicative of the state of women in the days. there was a women at "the washington post," i knew her well, suzanne in the book she was taken off a prize civil rights assignment at the post because the people who were involved in this civil rights protest were going to have meeting here at the press club. and because weren't allowed in the press club, the "post" instead of complaining said we'll assign a man to it. that's the way things were. >> what was your beat at "the washington post"? >> i had a variety of beats at the "post." i covered the suburbs the city of alexander rei ya and i later covered which is now the superior co
, accounting down the road, but we'll save that for another day. but to look at policies that really do streamline the process, reduce wait times, make visas more readily available, and really just makes the united states a more simpler place, a more business friendly place, to keep foreign workers were educated here, here as well as people, again, a nation that was founded by immigrants, to promote from unemployment stand for in order to make it a more user-friendly special. we've seen a lot of the proposals that have come out. definitely immigration week. we have seen the president's proposal, the senate gang of eight proposal, which includes a high skilled piece of the and we hope it gets the attention that it deserves in the broader, on the broader discussion. at reasoned approach, and look at things that, including things that are also interested other legislation. you may also see the bill that was introduced i squared bill which was a lot of the positive interesting and things that would really help i think high-tech engine with and keeping talent here, one of which is waving the
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)